Maša Seničić

Scriptwriter

Born:

1990, Belgrade (Serbia)

Education: 

PhD candidate in Theory of Dramatic Arts, Media and Culture (Faculty of Drama Arts,

Belgrade)

MA in Theory of Dramatic Arts, Media and Culture (Faculty of Drama Arts, Belgrade)

BA in Dramaturgy (Faculty of Drama Arts, Belgrade)

Place of Residence:

Belgrade (Serbia)

Writes in Languages:

Serbian, English

Biography

Masa Seničić is a scriptwriter and a poet. She has taken part in
international film and theatre projects, both as an author and a
collaborator, while also creatively contributing to numerous festivals
as a writer, progammer and a coordinator (Auteur Film Festival, Free
Zone Festival, Bašta fest, FEST etc). Seničić participated in different
interdisciplinary workshops, at the same time emerging herself in
education in audiovisual culture. Her first poetry book “The Ocean”
was published in 2015.

Sample of previous work

Projects in development

BROD / OCEAN LINER

short animated
developed script

On a luxurious transatlantic cruiser, exhilarated passengers are about to sail into oblivion.

Attached to the project: co-writer, director, producer
Looking for: not looking for new partners

Keywords: ocean liner, boat party, luxurious, disaster 

KRHKOST KIČME / BRITTLE BONES

feature fiction
first draft of the script

Rabbits make friendly, sensitive pets; unless, of course, they are dead.

Attached to the project: director, producer 
Looking for: co-producer

Keywords: middle class, family, marriage, dead rabbit, suburbs, fragile, conformist

More from Projects

Filmography and Awards

2016 INCARNATION, feature film by Filip Kovačević, co-writer
2013 MORNING PRAYERS, short fiction directed by Konstantina Kotzamani & Katarina Stanković, co-writer
2011 BOYS, WHERE ARE YOU, short fiction directed by Jelena Gavrilović, script collaborator

My five favourite films

  1. Bad Timing (1980)
    by Nicolas Roeg
  2. The Loneliness of the Long Distance
    Runner (1962)
    by Tony Richardson
  3. Крылья (1966)
    by Larisa Shepitko
  4. Le fantôme de la liberté (1974)
    by Luis Buñuel
  5. 3 women (1977)
    by Robert Altman

Favourite scene I wrote

EXT. IN THE STREET, NIGHT
It’s about half past four in the morning. The streets of Sarajevo are almost entirely deserted. The Boy and The Girl seem to walk aimlessly. They talk while walking. Occasionally a word slips out a bit louder than the rest of the dialogue, or pronounced with an unusual diction, but typical of the state they are in.
THE GIRL                             
In a church?                              
THE BOY
Yeaaaah, in aaaaaaa 
c c h u u u u r c h!                             
THE GIRL
Who would let them make a club
in a church?
THE BOY
No really, who would let them
make a club in a church… I tell
you it’s true… They threw bunch
of parties in the basement… Why
doesn’t anybody think of making
something like that here?
THE GIRL
Mmmmm…
THE BOY
Wait… Where would we possibly…
THE GIRL
Oh my ears are still…
THE BOY
…Where would we possibly make…
something like that? Here…
THE GIRL
…From the club…
Opens her mouth a few times to release the pressure.
THE GIRL
My ears are still… So… Oh but
it also feels kind of nice.
THE BOY
Yeah?! I think it’s not only
from the club. Are you sure
we can go there?
THE GIRL
Mmmmmmm… No, no, it’s fine…
You’ll see.
Her voice lowers down as if she’s embarrassed of needing to explain this to him.
THE GIRL
We just have to wait a bit
until he leaves the apartment. 
THE BOY
What if he doesn’t?
The Girl stopps for brief moment just to feel the breeze and close her eyes, so now she walks just two steps behind The Boy. He’s not looking at her but in front of himself, at the pavement.
THE GIRL
No, no, he will. Trust me, I
know. He goes out to pray each
dawn. What’s the time? Oh look!
The Girl stops in front of the antique shop window; the Boy continues walking but shortly gets back into frame. The shop seems a bit dirty, almost abandoned, and the window looks as if it hasn’t been cleaned in a while. The Girl is staring at an unusual thing glowing in the midst of different kinds of old objects and furniture: a small aquarium filled with little fishes and dying sea weed. They do not move until she lifts her finger up and drags it across the window glass, following one of the fishes. She switches to another one as their paths cross and it comes closer.
THE GIRL
Some aren’t moving. They’re
sleeping… Eyes open. Imagine.
THE BOY
Maybe they are dead.
THE GIRL
A dead fish floats to the top.
THE BOY
Oh really?
THE GIRL
Really. No, these are watching
us. Do you think they know where
they are?
THE BOY
No, they’re stupid. Their memory
is super short. 3 seconds.
3 seconds pass looking at the aquarium, and then they look at each other pretending that they are seeing each other for the first time. They laugh.
THE GIRL
Ana used to have a goldfish.
She called him… Him? Her? Her.
She called her “Eight”. I don’t
remember why.
THE BOY
Who is Ana?
About 3 seconds have passed.
THE GIRL
Ana who? You’re right…«Eight»
was so stupid. It just stopped
eating and died.
THE BOY
Wait…
He stops at the city fountain to drink some water.
THE GIRL
We took it out with a bowl, not
with the net, with a bowl. Are
you following me?
The boy is still drinking, then lifts his head up and looks at the girl.
THE BOY
Yes, yes… With the bowl.
He wipes his lips and his cheek.
THE BOY
And then? And?… What are you
doing?
The girl is holding her breath and then exhales.
THE GIRL
20 seconds… Pf.
The chanting from a loudspeaker from a nearby mosque announces the beginning of the morning prayer. Unlike before, she starts walking faster.
THE BOY
Hey… Wait, slow down!
The Girl doesn’t really listen to him, she looks at the pavement and tries not to step on the lines making large steps and being a bit ahead of him. She inhales deeply again, holding her breath.

My favourite film quote

“The prospect of quiet happiness stretching
indefinitely before me depresses me.”

L’amour l’après-midi (1972)